Pay by Phone parking introduced

Car park changes

 

A new way of paying for parking in Blaby District Council’s car parks has been introduced to make cashless payments easier.

With Johns Court and Enderby Road car parks in Blaby, as well as Leicester Rd in Narborough remaining free throughout September, normal charges will apply in Weavers Court and the Railway Station car parks from Tuesday 01 September.

From this date PayByPhone will be introduced. The app-based service will mean visitors can make their payment over the phone with no need to use a ticket machine, or display a ticket in their car.

There will also be no service charge for using the app.

Find out more about PayByPhone.

26 August 2020

Additional business grant funding distributed

Blaby District Council Logo

Nearly £500,000 of government funding has been given out by Blaby District Council to more than 60 local businesses as part of the Discretionary Grants Scheme.

Additional funding was provided by the government for the Council to help those who weren’t eligible for the government’s covid-related schemes, including the Small Business or Retail, Leisure and Hospitality Funds.

A local scheme was formed to distribute the £532,000 discretionary funding from the government. Priority given to specific sectors including properties occupied by a charity, regular market traders and businesses considered to be important to the local economy.

As well as distributing funding to businesses during the coronavirus pandemic, Blaby District Council has been supporting local businesses in Blaby Town Centre and set up a new Business Hub. The Business Hub will see a specialist team at the Council work with local firms, providing resources, assistance and information on a range of issues.

Councillor Maggie Wright, Deputy Leader and Portfolio Holder of Finance and Assets, said: “I am extremely proud of our team, who have worked incredibly hard to process the applications we have received from during this traumatic period for businesses. Their huge effort has seen nearly £11 million in grants awarded to more than 950 businesses.”

“The funding we have provided is vital for not only each individual businesses’ survival during this pandemic, but also the economic prosperity of the district, which we are committed to supporting through our new Business Hub.”

Business can access the business hub by visiting the Business Hub page

Community Grants reopen for applications

Vital support for local organisations is available as Community Grants from Blaby District Council re-open following the coronavirus pandemic.

The first round of grants will prioritise help for organisations who need support directly as a result of the recent pandemic. To ensure as many groups as possible receive funding, more money will be available in the first round, with the maximum Small Capital and Revenue Grants amounts increasing to £1,000.

There will also be a more flexible approach to project costs to help organisations that have lost income during this difficult period. The deadline for grants is midday on Friday 14 August.

The reopening of the Community Grants scheme coincides with the launch of the Voluntary and Community Sector Hub. This new section of the Blaby District Council website is dedicated to supporting local charities, community groups, sports clubs and venues across the local area.

Containing a range of information on funding, government guidance, volunteering and supporting vulnerable people, the Voluntary and Community Sector Hub information page is the ideal place for any local organisations in need of help and advice.

Councillor Sharon Coe, Portfolio Holder for Health, Wellbeing and Regulatory Services, said: “We’ve always known that our voluntary sector, and the hundreds of volunteers who put themselves forward, play an incredibly important role in the wellbeing and lives of local residents. We have seen this through the new and established organisations that have sprung into action over the last few months.

“The voluntary and community sector still faces huge challenges over the coming months as they try to make up for lost income or fundraising opportunities.

“We hope that by providing timely information, advice and financial support we can help our much-loved voluntary sector organisations get back on their feet as quickly as possible.”

For full details about the Community Grants, including eligibility criteria, visit the webpage.

Play areas set to reopen

 

 

bdc

 

We are looking forward to welcoming people back to our 7 play areas that will reopen on Monday 20 July.

  • Copt Oak Gardens, Narborough
  • Fosse Meadows (play area), Sharnford
  • Foulds Lane, Whetstone
  • Nowells Close, Glen Parva
  • Roundhills Park, Elmesthorpe
  • Speedwell Close, Narborough
  • The Osiers (play area and outdoor gym), Braunstone

Important safety measures have been completed ready for reopening and signs installed to remind users about the importance of safety rules including social distancing, hygiene and limiting numbers, to reduce the risk of spreading Covid-19.

It will be brilliant to see children playing in local play areas again and following the guidance about how to use the facilities safely.  As a reminder please put your litter in a bin when you’re using the parks and play areas or take it home with you and throw it away there.  If the bin is full, please don’t leave litter beside it as this is also a risk to wildlife – please take it home with you instead.

We all have to do our bit to stay safe, save lives and to ensure that we can keep the district open.

17 July 2020

Leicester Lockdown extension – Blaby District Council update

 

 

A map of the local Leicester Lockdown

 

Following last night’s announcement, we know that some parts of the district will be affected by the Leicester lockdown.    Last night’s speech can be found at www.gov.uk/government/speeches/local-action-to-tackle-coronavirus

The areas in the district affected by the Leicester Lockdown are:

  • Braunstone Town (including Fosse Park)
  • Glenfield
  • Glen Parva
  • Leicester Forest East (the area east of the M1)
  • Thorpe Astley

The red line on the map marks the area affected by the Lockdown.  Residents and businesses clearly outside the red line can continue as normal.  Those inside the red line will need to follow local lockdown restrictions:-

– Pubs, restaurants and hairdressers will not open as planned this Saturday and shops allowed to open on 15th June will have to close again from today.
– Make only essential journeys and stay home as much as you can if you are in this area.
– Schools to close from Thursday
– The relaxation of shielding measures planned for 6 July cannot take place

Information will also be available on the Leicestershire County Council website. They will also have a postcode checker available for anyone living within, or close to the ‘red line’ shown in the map.

We are awaiting further detail and clarification, and will update this page when we have more information.

You can also follow us on Facebook or Twitter, and Sign Up to get email alerts of the latest.

Covid 19 – Updated Government Advice

The government has set out its plan to return life to as near normal as we can, for as many people as we can, as quickly and fairly as possible in order to safeguard livelihoods, but in a way that is safe and continues to protect our NHS.

The government has published guidance on staying safe outside your home and guidance on social distancing rules. This page sets out key FAQs to help you prepare for these changes.

This guidance applies in England – people in ScotlandWales and Northern Ireland should follow the specific rules in those parts of the UK.

1. Gatherings, public spaces, and outdoor activities

1.1 What can I do that I couldn’t do before?

From 13 June, you will be able to:

  • Form a ‘support bubble’ with one other household if you live alone or are a single parent with dependent children – in other words, you are in a household where there is only one adult. All those in a support bubble will be able to act as if they live in the same household – meaning they can spend time together inside each other’s homes and do not need to stay 2 metres apart. Support bubbles should be exclusive – meaning you should not switch the household you are in a bubble with or connect with multiple households
  • Attend your place of worship for the purposes of individual prayer

From 15 June:

  • You will be able to visit any type of shop and some additional outdoor attractions – drive-in cinemas, zoos, and safari parks
  • Year 10 and 12 pupils in secondary schools and further education colleges will begin to receive some face to face support
  • You will have to wear a face covering on public transport

You will still be able to meet outdoors with groups of up to six people from different households, provided social distancing is observed and you stay 2 metres away from anyone outside your household or support bubble.

As before, you cannot:

  • visit friends and family inside their homes (unless you are in a support bubble from 13 June) or for other limited circumstances set out in law
  • stay away from your home or your support bubble household overnight – including holidays – except for in a limited set of circumstances, such as for work purposes
  • exercise in an indoor sports court, gym or leisure centre, or go swimming in a public pool
  • use an outdoor gym or playground
  • gather outdoors in a group of more than six (unless exclusively with members of your own household or support bubble)

1.2 I don’t have to stay at home anymore?

You should continue to stay alert and limit your contact with others. Staying at home is the easiest way to do this.

From 13 June, if you are in a support bubble, you may spend time outdoors or inside either home within the bubble.

Everyone may spend time outdoors with groups of up to six people from outside your household or bubble. You should stay alert and always practise social distancing with people from outside of your household or support bubble, keeping 2 metres apart.

The more people you have interactions with, the more chance the virus has to spread. Therefore, try to limit the number of people you see – especially over short periods of time.

If you are showing coronavirus symptoms, or if you or any of your household are self-isolating, for example if you have been contacted as part of the test and trace programme, you should stay at home – this is critical to staying safe and saving lives.

You can find more information on meeting people you don’t live with here.

1.3 How many people am I allowed to meet with outdoors?

You are allowed to meet in groups of up to six people who you do not live with or who are not in your support bubble.

You are only allowed to meet in groups of more than six people if everyone is a member of the same household or, from 13 June, support bubble.

There is more information about the rules you should follow when meeting people you do not live with here.

1.4 So, can I visit people indoors now and invite them into my own home?

Only if you are in a support bubble with them.

From 13 June, if you are a single adult household – either you live alone or only with dependent children – you can form a support bubble with one other household. This means you can see other members of your support bubble indoors and outside. You will also be able to be less than 2 metres apart and stay overnight as if you were members of the same household. Individuals who form a bubble with one household may not form a bubble with anyone else.

It is not yet possible for people who are not in support bubbles to meet inside other people’s homes – that remains against the law. This is critical to helping us control the virus and keep people safe.

1.5 What is a criminal offence?

It is a criminal offence to:

  • meet indoors with anyone who is not a member of your household or, from 13 June, your support bubble, except for specific exceptions set out in law
  • meet outdoors in a group of more than six with people who are not in your household or support bubble, except for specific exceptions set out in law
  • incite others to break the rules by e.g. inviting people to a party
  • threaten others with infection by coronavirus, for example by coughing or spitting in their direction

1.6 Can I visit a clinically vulnerable person?

We know that people 70 and over, those with certain underlying conditions and pregnant women may be more clinically vulnerable, so we have advised them to take particular care to avoid contact with others.

That means such individuals can meet people outdoors but should be especially careful. Similarly, clinically vulnerable people can form a support bubble with another household, if one of the households is an adult living alone or with children, but extra care should be taken. For example all members of the support bubble should be especially careful to socially distance from people outside of the household or bubble.

You can also visit a clinically vulnerable person inside if you are providing care or assistance to them, following the advice set out here. You should not do so if you have coronavirus symptoms, however mild.

Wherever possible, you should stay at least 2 metres away from others, use a tissue when sneezing and dispose of it safely, cough into the crook of your elbow and wash your hands for at least 20 seconds or use hand sanitiser if washing facilities are not easily available.

If someone is defined as clinically extremely vulnerable and being asked to shield, you should follow the guidance for a shielded person as this is different to the wider clinically vulnerable group. Shielded people are advised not to form a ‘support bubble’ due to the heightened risks for this group.

1.7 Are there restrictions on how far I can travel for my exercise or outdoor activity?

No. You can travel to outdoor open space irrespective of distance, as long as you can return the same night and do not put others at risk because of services you may need in the time you are away. You should continue to avoid using public transport and should cycle, walk or drive wherever possible.

If visiting other parts of the UK – Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland – you must adhere to the laws and guidance of the devolved administrations at all times.

You shouldn’t travel with someone from outside your household unless you can practise social distancing – for example by cycling.

1.8 Can I use public transport if I’m seeing friends in a park or going to my parents’ garden?

You should avoid using public transport if you can. You should cycle, walk or drive wherever possible. Consider all other forms of transport before using public transport. If you need to use public transport, you should follow the safer travel guidance for passengers.

1.9 Can I share a private vehicle with someone from another household?

You should avoid sharing a private vehicle with anyone outside of your household or ‘support bubble’ as you will not be able to keep to strict social distancing guidelines. The Department for Transport has provided specific guidance on using private vehicles. Please see their guidance on Private cars and other vehicles for more information on car sharing and traveling with people outside your household group.

1.10 Are day trips and holidays ok? Can people stay in second homes?

Day trips to outdoor open space are permitted as long as you can return the same night. You should make sure you do not put others at risk because of services you may need in the time you are away. You should practise social distancing from other people outside your household or ‘support bubble’. You should continue to avoid using public transport if you can. Consider all other forms of transport before using public transport. If you need to use public transport, you should follow the safer travel guidance for passengers.

You are not permitted to stay overnight away from the place where you or your support bubble are living – for a holiday or similar purpose – in the UK or overseas. This includes staying overnight in a second home. If your work requires you to stay away from home you can do so but should continue to practise social distancing. You can also stay overnight in an emergency, to escape harm or under other limited circumstances.

Premises such as hotels and bed and breakfasts will remain closed, except where providing accommodation for specific reasons set out in law, such as for critical workers where required for a reason relating to their work. Hotels are also available to host those self-isolating after arriving in the UK (where no other accommodation is available).

1.11 I am a critical worker. Can I stay overnight in a hotel or second home?

Yes, if you need to for work reasons. You should not stay with family, friends, or colleagues even for work reasons.

However, if you have a pre-existing arrangement where you share a second home with another person that you both use for work purposes and where you both need to work away from home, you could both stay at that place at the same time. You should only do this if both of you are critical workers and work together, you need to stay there for work reasons, and there is no reasonable alternative.

1.12 Can students return to their family home if they’ve been in halls all this time?

The general rule is that staying overnight somewhere that is not your home – the place you live – is not allowed.

If a student is opting to change their primary residence for the purpose of the emergency period to live back at their family home, this is permitted.

1.13 Will public toilets reopen?

Councils are responsible for public toilets and this decision is up to them. If you need to use any of these facilities, you should practise social distancing and good hygiene (i.e. washing your hands thoroughly).

1.14 Can I visit outdoor tourist sites? What about indoor ones?

Yes, you can still travel to outdoor areas, such as National Parks or beaches. Some venues are not allowed to be open so it is advisable to check ahead to ensure the venue is open to visitors.

Indoor sites and some outdoor attractions are still not allowed to re-open.

1.15 Is there a limit on the number of people attending funerals?

The guidance on people attending funerals has not changed, except that members of a ‘support bubble’ would also count as household members from 13 June.

1.16 Can weddings go ahead?

No, there’s no change at this time – you cannot gather in sufficient numbers indoors to enable a wedding ceremony. We understand the frustration couples planning a wedding must be feeling at this time. We are keeping these restrictions under review and will ease them as soon as it is safe to do so. We will continue to work closely with faith leaders and local government over the coming weeks to go through the practicalities of doing so.

Marriages and civil partnerships under the special procedure for those who are seriously ill and not expected to recover, are taking place in some cases where it is safe to do so in line with PHE guidance.

1.17 Can I pray in a place of worship?

Yes, from 13 June, you will be able to independently pray in a church, mosque, synagogue, temple or other place of worship. We will continue to review when it might be safe to ease other restrictions on places of worship, including for communal prayer.

1.18 Can I register the birth of my child?

You are permitted to register the birth of your child. You should check whether your local register office is open. The office will also be able to advise you on appointment availability.

2. Vulnerable groups, shielding, 70 year olds and over, and care homes

2.1 Does easing restrictions apply to healthy 70 year olds and over?

Yes. However, the advice for those aged 70 and over continues to be that they should take particular care to minimise contact with others outside their household.

If they do go out more frequently, they should be careful to maintain distance from others. They and everyone should continue to comply with any general social distancing restrictions.

We know that those aged 70 and over can be absolutely fit and healthy and it’s not the case that everybody over 70 has a chronic health condition or an underlying disease.

But unfortunately, we also know that as you get older, there is a higher risk of coronavirus having a more serious impact with infection. Complications and deaths are more common in the elderly, even those without pre-existing conditions.

2.2 How long will shielding be in place?

We’ve advised individuals with very specific medical conditions to shield until the end of June and to do everything they can to stay at home. Those shielding may wish to consider spending time outdoors once a day. This can be with members of their own household or, for those shielding alone, with one person from another household. We can safely give this advice because the risk of transmission is much lower outdoors. However, we do not advise shielding individuals to form a support bubble.

If individuals wish to spend time outdoors, they should take extra care to minimise contact with others by keeping 2 metres apart at all times. This is because we believe they are likely to be at the greatest risk of serious complications from coronavirus.

We know this is challenging guidance to follow, which is why we have a support scheme in place to provide help with access to food and basic supplies, care, medicines and social support.

We are keeping the guidance to shielded people under review.

2.3 What safety standards will need to be put in place in care homes?

We have issued detailed guidance about infection control and staff safety in care homes to help admit and care for residents safely and protect care home staff.

This includes isolation procedures, PPE and infection control training for all staff, cleaning and how to provide personal care safely.

As with all of our advice, this guidance is kept under constant review and updated frequently, in line with the latest scientific evidence.

3. Going to work / Safer spaces

3.1 Who is allowed to go to work?

In the first instance, employers should make every effort to support working from home, including by providing suitable IT and equipment as they have been already. This will apply to many different types of businesses, particularly those who typically would have worked in offices or online.

Where work can only be done in the workplace, we have set out tailored guidelines for employers to help protect their workforce and customers from coronavirus while still continuing to trade or getting their business back up and running. We have published detailed COVID-19 secure guidelines, which has been developed in consultation with businesses and trades unions.

These COVID-19 Secure guidelines apply to those in essential retail like:

  • supermarkets and other retail, like clothing and electronic stores
  • those in construction and manufacturing
  • those working in labs and research facilities
  • those administering takeaways and deliveries at restaurants and cafes
  • tradesmen, cleaners and others who work in people’s homes
  • those who are facilitating trade or transport goods

Restaurants, pubs, bars, gyms and leisure centres will remain closed (except for takeaway services where relevant). They will reopen in a phased manner provided it is safe for everyone for them to do so and they are able to meet the COVID-19 Secure guidelines to protect consumers and workers.

There are specific guidelines for those who are vulnerable, shielding, or showing symptoms that should be observed when considering whether to go back to work.

3.2 What does it mean to be a critical worker?

Critical workers are those working in health and care and other essential services, who can take their children to school or childcare, regardless of year group, and can use hotels and other accommodation services for work related purposes – for example if they can’t get home after a shift or need to isolate from their families. This critical worker definition does not affect whether or not you can travel to work – if you are not a critical worker, you may still travel to work if you cannot reasonably work from home.

3.3 Will you open pubs / restaurants / hairdressers in July?

The roadmap sets out that some businesses (like pubs, restaurants, hairdressers and indoor cinemas) will not open until Step 3 is reached.

The government’s current planning assumption is that this step will be no earlier than 4 July and subject to further detailed scientific advice, provided closer to the time, on how far we can go. When they do reopen, they should also meet the COVID-19 Secure guidelines.

3.4 What are the ‘COVID-19 Secure’ safety guidelines workplaces have to put in place?

We have set out clear, practical steps that businesses should take to ensure their workplaces are COVID-19 Secure and give their staff the confidence to return back to work.

These include how to keep as many people as possible safely apart from those they do not live with in various workplace settings.

4. Workers’ rights

4.1 My employer is asking me to come to work but I’m scared.

Employers and staff should discuss and agree working arrangements.

Employers should make all efforts to help people to work from home where they can. But where work cannot be done at home, employers should take clear, practical steps to help protect workers and create safe places to work, such as by shifting working or staggering processes and by following the “COVID-19 Secure” guidelines. To identify the precautions needed to manage risk, your employer should discuss the workplace risk assessment with you to identify the practical ways of managing those risks.

If you remain concerned that your employer is not taking all practical steps to promote social distancing then you can report this to your local authority or the Health and Safety Executive who can take a range of action, including where appropriate requiring your employer to take additional steps.

4.2 What if they try to fire me because I won’t go to work but cannot work at home?

We urge employers to take socially responsible decisions and listen to the concerns of their staff. Employers and employees should come to a pragmatic agreement about their working arrangements.

If individuals need advice, they should approach ACAS where they can get impartial advice about work disputes.

5. Public Transport

5.1 Who is allowed to travel on public transport?

If you need to travel to work or make an essential journey, you should cycle or walk if you can, but you can use public transport if this is not possible. Before you travel on public transport, consider if your journey is necessary and if you can, stay local. Try to reduce your travel. This will help keep the transport network running and allows people who need to make essential journeys to travel safely.

We have set out further advice on how to stay safe during your journey.

5.2 Should people wear face coverings on public transport?

Yes. From 15 June it will be a legal requirement to wear a face covering on public transport. This will help to ensure that transport is as safe as possible as more people begin to return to work and go shopping. Transport operators will enforce this requirement, and the police will also be able to do so. This will mean you can be refused travel if you don’t comply and could be fined. You should also be prepared to remove your face covering if asked to do so by police officers and staff for the purposes of identification.

More generally, if you can, you are advised to wear face coverings in enclosed public space where social distancing is not possible and where you are more likely to come into contact with people you do not normally meet. For example, in some shops.

We have published guidance for those making face coverings at home, to help illustrate the process.

A face covering is not the same as the surgical masks or respirators used as part of personal protective equipment by healthcare and other workers; these should continue to be reserved for those who need them to protect against risks in their workplace such as health and care workers and those in industrial settings like those exposed to dust hazards.

5.3 Will a face covering stop me getting COVID-19?

The evidence suggests that face coverings can help us protect each other and reduce the spread of the disease if someone is suffering from coronavirus, but not showing symptoms. That is why it is important to wear a face covering on public transport and this will be required by law from the 15 June.

To protect yourself, you should also continue to follow social distancing measures and isolation guidance and wash your hands regularly.

5.4 Can I use public transport to get to green spaces?

You should still avoid using public transport wherever possible. Consider all other forms of transport before using public transport. If you need to use public transport, you must wear a face covering and you should follow the safer travel guidance for passengers.

6. Schools and Childcare

6.1 Can children go back to early years settings and schools or university?

Early years settings are open for all children.

Primary schools are open for children in Reception, Year 1 and Year 6 in smaller class sizes, as well as all children of critical workers and vulnerable children.

From Monday 15 June, secondary schools and further education colleges will also begin some face to face support with Year 10 and 12 pupils who have key exams next year. Only around a quarter of these pupils will be in school at any one time.

6.2 How will you make sure it is safe?

Keeping children and staff safe is our utmost priority. As more children return to school, we require new safety standards to set out how schools and early years settings can be adapted to operate safely.

We have published guidance advising schools and early years on reopening to ensure schools can adequately prepare new safety measures to operate safely and minimise the spread of the virus.

Protective measures to reduce transmission include regular hand cleaning, hygiene and cleaning measures, and small consistent group and class sizes of no more than 15 pupils. We have asked schools to consider staggering drop-off and arrival times, break times and assemblies, and make use of outdoor space.

7. Borders / international visitors

7.1 Are you isolating people at the border now?

The scientific advice shows that when domestic transmission is high, cases from abroad represent a small amount of the overall total and make no significant difference to the epidemic. Now that domestic transmission within the UK is coming under control, and other countries begin to lift lockdown measures, it is the right time to prepare new measures at the border. You can find out more about self-isolation when you travel to the UK here.

8. Enforcement

8.1 How will police enforce the new rules?

The police and local authorities have the powers to enforce the requirements set out in law if people do not comply with them. The police will act with discretion and common sense in applying these measures, but if you breach the regulations, they may instruct you to disperse, leave an area, issue you with a fixed penalty notice or arrest you where they believe it necessary. They may also instruct you to take steps to stop your children breaking these legal requirements again if they have already done so.

If the police believe that you have broken these laws – or if you refuse to follow their instructions enforcing the law – a police officer may issue you with a fixed penalty notice of £100 (reduced to £50 if paid within 14 days). If you have already received a fixed penalty notice, the amount for further offences will increase in line with the table below.

First offence £100
Second offence £200
Third offence £400
Fourth offence £800
Fifth offence £1600
Maximum penalty £3200

For both individuals and companies, if you do not pay your fine you could be taken to court, with magistrates able to impose unlimited fines.

Business Hub to support district

blaby logo

Blaby District Council has launched a new Business Hub as part of the authority’s commitment to supporting local business during the Coronavirus pandemic.

The Business Hub is an opportunity to access advice and guidance on dealing with the coronavirus pandemic.

From safely opening a business to applying for grants, the Hub’s wide-ranging support will be for both business owners and the self-employed. ‘Account Managers’ will be given to ensure a single point of contact to ensure a hassle-free process.

Employers will be able to get easy-to-understand details on their responsibilities for keeping staff safe, home working and sick pay. Sole traders and self-employed people can find out about working in people’s homes and negotiating mortgage holidays.

Specialist information for food businesses and those in the tourism industry is also available.

Councillor Ben Taylor, Portfolio Holder for Planning, Housing Strategy and Economic Development, said: “We are extremely pleased to offer the Business Hub to our local businesses. This is an incredibly tough time for so many hard-working business owners and we want to do all we can to help.”

“Blaby District Council has a proud record of supporting and working with businesses in the district to help them thrive, and this is even more important during these unprecedented times. We would encourage those who need support to get in touch with the Hub to help you get the support you need.”

“Together we can continue to build strong links with our local businesses and evolve the Business Hub to be an integral part of Blaby District’s future.”
For more information about the support and to register for the Business Hub on the webpage.

Leicestershire County Council Re-opening of seven county waste sites

 

 

The selected sites will open seven days a week to county residents – with a booked appointment only – from Monday, 18th May. They are at Barwell, Lount, Market Harborough, Melton Mowbray, Mountsorrel, Oadby and Whetstone.

All visits will need to be book by appointment using the link below

https://www.leicestershire.gov.uk/environment-and-planning/waste-and-recycling/book-a-waste-site-appointment

The council is anticipating there will be a high level of demand for bookings and is reassuring residents that more slots will be made available over the coming weeks.

People are being asked to only bring what they cannot safely store at home for the time being, or cannot wait for their kerbside collection services, many of which are being reinstated by district councils

Social distancing will be in operation at the sites, and plans will also include traffic management arrangements.

There will be parking restrictions in place around the immediate vicinity of the waste sites.

There will be restrictions on the type of items people will be able to bring to county locations – so some waste types will still have to wait.

 

TEMPORARY TRAFFIC REGULATION ORDER

Unnamed road off of Enderby Road, Whetstone

A prohibition of parking is required on the un named road from its junction with Enderby Road for approx. 200 m on both sides of the carriageway.

 

 

Covid 19 – Updated Government Advice FAQ’s

Please use the link below for full updated Government Advice and Frequently Asked Questions taken from the GOV.UK website

Coronavirus outbreak FAQs_ what you can and can’t do – GOV.UK

Some helpful information also reproduced below for ease of reading.

  1. Public spaces / outdoor activities / exercise

1.1 What can I do from Wednesday 13 May that I couldn’t do before?

There will be a limited number of things you can do on Wednesday that you cannot do now:

  • spend time outdoors – for example sitting and enjoying the fresh air, picnicking, or sunbathing
  • meet one other person from a different household outdoors – following social distancing guidelines
  • exercise outdoors as often as you wish – following social distancing guidelines
  • use outdoor sports courts or facilities, such as a tennis or basketball court, or golf course – with members of your household, or one other person while staying 2 metres apart
  • go to a garden centre

At all times, you should continue to observe social distancing guidelines when you are outside your home, including ensuring you are 2 metres away from anyone outside your household. As with before, you cannot:

  • visit friends and family in their homes
  • exercise in an indoor sports court, gym or leisure centre, or go swimming in a public pool
  • use an outdoor gym or playground
  • visit a private or ticketed attraction
  • gather in a group of more than two (excluding members of your own household), except for a few specific exceptions set out in law (for work, funerals, house moves, supporting the vulnerable, in emergencies and to fulfil legal obligations)

If you are showing coronavirus symptoms, or if you or any of your household are self-isolating, you should stay at home – this is critical to staying safe and saving lives.

1.2 I don’t have to stay at home anymore?

You should stay at home as much as possible. The reasons you may leave home include:

  • for work, where you cannot work from home
  • going to shops that are permitted to be open – to get things like food and medicine
  • to exercise or spend time outdoors
  • any medical need, including to donate blood, avoid injury or illness, escape risk of harm, or to provide care or to help a vulnerable person

These reasons are exceptions and a fuller list is set out in the regulations. Even when doing these activities, you should be minimising time spent away from the home and ensuring that you are two metres apart from anyone outside of your household.

1.3 Are you reopening tennis courts / golf courses / basketball courts etc

Yes. Sports courts can re-open, but you should only partake in such activities alone, with members of your household, or with one other person from outside your household, while practising social distancing. You should take particular care if you need to use any indoor facilities next to these outdoor courts, such as toilets.

You should not use these facilities if you are showing coronavirus symptoms, or if you or any of your household are self-isolating.

1.4 Can I meet my friends and family in the park?

You can meet one other person from outside your household if you are outdoors. Public gatherings of more than 2 people from different households are prohibited in law. There are no limits on gatherings in the park with members of your household.

1.5 On what date can I expand my household group?

The government has asked the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE) to advise on the concept of “bubbles”, which would mean allowing people to expand their household group to include one other household. For the time being, you cannot visit friends or family, except to spend time outdoors with up to one person from a different household.

1.6 Can I go out to help a vulnerable person?

You can go out to care for or help a vulnerable person, or to provide other voluntary or charitable services, following the advice set out here. You should not do so if you have coronavirus symptoms, however mild.

Wherever possible, you should stay at least two metres away from others, and wash your hands for at least 20 seconds (or use hand sanitiser if soap and water are not available).

1.7 Are there restrictions on how far I can travel for my exercise or outdoor activity?

No. You can travel to outdoor open space irrespective of distance. You shouldn’t travel with someone from outside your household unless you can practise social distancing – for example by cycling. Leaving your home – the place you live – to stay at another home is not allowed.

1.8 Can I share a private vehicle with someone from another household?

No. You can only travel in a private vehicle alone, or with members of your household.

1.9 Are day trips and holidays ok? Can people stay in second homes?

Day trips to outdoor open space, in a private vehicle, are permitted. You should practise social distancing from other people outside your household.

Leaving your home – the place you live – to stay at another home for a holiday or other purpose is not allowed. This includes visiting second homes.

Premises such as hotels and bed and breakfasts will remain closed, except where providing accommodation for specific reasons set out in law, such as for critical workers where required for a reason relating to their work.

1.10 Can students return to their family home if they’ve been in halls all this time?

In general, leaving your home – the place you live – to stay at another home is not allowed.

If a student is moving permanently to live back at their family home, this is permitted.

1.11 Is there a limit on the number of people attending funerals?

There is no change to the guidance on attending funerals at present.

1.12 Can weddings go ahead?

There’s no change at this time, but we have set out our intention to enable small wedding ceremonies from 1 June. We understand the frustration couples planning a wedding must be feeling at this time. As with all the necessary coronavirus restrictions on register offices, places of worship and other venues, we will look to ease them as soon as it is safe to do so. We will work closely with faith leaders and local government over the coming weeks to go through the practicalities.

  1. Vulnerable groups, shielding, 70 year olds and over, and care homes

2.1 Does easing restrictions apply to healthy 70 year olds and over?

The advice for those aged 70 and over continues to be that they should take particular care to minimise contact with others outside their household.

If they do go out more frequently, they should be careful to maintain distance from others. They and everyone should continue to comply with any general social distancing restrictions.

We know that those aged 70 and over can be absolutely fit and healthy and it’s not the case that everybody over 70 has a chronic health condition or an underlying disease.

But unfortunately, we also know that as you get older, there is a higher risk of coronavirus having a more serious impact with infection. Complications and deaths are more common in the elderly, even those without pre-existing conditions.

Anyone who has been advised to shield by the NHS or their GP, including those 70 and over, should continue to do this until at least the end of June.

2.2 How long will shielding be in place?

We’ve advised individuals with very specific medical conditions to shield until the end of June and to do everything they can to stay at home. This is because we believe they are likely to be at the greatest risk of serious complications from coronavirus.

We know this is challenging guidance to follow, which is why we have a support scheme in place to provide help with access to food and basic supplies, care, medicines and social support.

We are keeping the guidance to shielded people under review.

2.3 What safety standards will need to be put in place in care homes?

We have issued detailed guidance about infection control and staff safety in care homes to help admit and care for residents safely and protect care home staff.

This includes isolation procedures, PPE and infection control training for all staff, cleaning and how to provide personal care safely.

As with all of our advice, this guidance is kept under constant review and updated frequently, in line with the latest scientific evidence.

  1. Going to work / Safer spaces

3.1 Who is allowed to go to work?

In the first instance, employers should make every effort to support working from home, including by providing suitable IT and equipment as they have been already. This will apply to many different types of businesses, particularly those who typically would have worked in offices or online.

Where work can only be done in the workplace, we have set out tailored guidelines for employers to help protect their workforce and customers from coronavirus while still continuing to trade or getting their business back up and running. We will be publishing even more detailed COVID-19 secure guidelines in the coming days, which has been developed in consultation with businesses and trades unions.

These ‘back to work’ guidelines apply to those in essential retail like:

  • supermarkets
  • those in construction and manufacturing
  • those working in labs and research facilities
  • those administering takeaways and deliveries at restaurants and cafes
  • tradesmen, cleaners and others who work in people’s homes
  • those who are facilitating trade or transport goods
  • and so on

Non-essential retail, restaurants, pubs, bars, gyms and leisure centres will remain closed. They will reopen in a phased manner provided it is safe to do so.

There are specific guidelines for those who are vulnerable, shielding, or showing symptoms.

3.2 What is a critical worker?

Critical workers are those working in health and care and other essential services, who can still take their children to school or childcare and can use hotels and other accommodation services for work related purposes – for example if they can’t get home after a shift or need to isolate from their families. This critical worker definition does not affect whether or not you can travel to work – if you are not a critical worker, you may still travel to work provided if you cannot reasonably work from home.

3.3 What is meant by the phased approach?

Not all forms of work will return to normal at once. People will have to prepare for a new type of normal. We need to make sure that any changes we do make are carefully monitored and that we aren’t doing anything to increase the risk of infection and push the Reproductive value (R0) above 1. R0 describes how many people on average will be infected for every one person who has COVID-19.

We will ensure that businesses have time to prepare their premises to operate as safely as possible.

We will set out more detail about the phasing in due course.

3.4 Will you open pubs / cinemas / hairdressers in July?

The roadmap sets out that some businesses (like pubs, cinemas or hairdressers) will not open until Step 3 is reached.

The government’s current planning assumption is that this step will be no earlier than 4 July and subject to further detailed scientific advice, provided closer to the time, on how far we can go. When they do reopen, they should also meet the COVID-19 secure guidelines.

3.5 What are the ‘Covid-Secure’ safety guidelines workplaces have to be put in place?

We have set out clear, practical steps that businesses should take to ensure their workplaces are safe and give their staff the confidence to return back to work. We will be publishing even more detailed COVID-19 secure guidelines.

These include how to keep as many people as possible safely apart from those they do not live with in various workplace settings.

3.6 Do people need to wear face coverings at work?

Face coverings are not compulsory. However, if you can, people are advised to wear face coverings in enclosed public spaces where social distancing is not possible or where you are more likely to come into contact with people you do not normally meet. For example, on public transport or in some shops. Face coverings can help us protect each other and reduce the spread of the disease if you are suffering from coronavirus, but not showing symptoms.

A face covering is not the same as the surgical masks or respirators used as part of personal protective equipment by healthcare and other workers; these should continue to be reserved for those who need them to protect against risks in their workplace such as health and care workers and those in industrial settings like those exposed to dust hazards.

3.7 Will a face covering stop me getting COVID-19?

The evidence suggests that face coverings can help us protect each other and reduce the spread of the disease if you are suffering from coronavirus, but not showing symptoms.

To protect yourself, you should continue to follow social distancing measures and isolation guidance and wash your hands regularly.

  1. Workers’ rights

4.1 My employer is asking me to come to work but I’m scared.

Employers and staff should discuss and agree working arrangements.

Employers should make all efforts to help people to work from home where they can. But where work cannot be done at home, employers should take clear, practical steps to help protect workers and create safe places to work, such as shift working or staggering processes. To identify the precautions needed to manage risk, your employer should discuss the workplace risk assessment with you to identify the practical ways of managing those risks.

If you remain concerned that your employer is not taking all practical steps to promote social distancing then you can report this to your local authority or the Health and Safety Executive who can take a range of action, including where appropriate requiring your employer to take additional steps.

We are publishing further specific “COVID-19 Secure” guidelines on how to make workplaces safe, which have been developed in consultation with over 200 business leaders and trades union organisations.

4.2 What if they try to fire me because I won’t go to work but cannot work at home?

We urge employers to take socially responsible decisions and listen to the concerns of their staff. Employers and employees should come to a pragmatic agreement about their working arrangements.

If individuals need advice, they should approach ACAS where they can get impartial advice about work disputes.

  1. Public Transport

5.1 Who is allowed to travel on public transport?

If you cannot work from home and have to travel to work, or if you must make an essential journey, you should cycle or walk wherever possible. Before you travel on public transport, consider if your journey is necessary and if you can, stay local. Try to reduce your travel. This will help keep the transport network running and allows people who need to make essential journeys to travel.

We’ll be setting out further guidance for passengers with more advice on how to stay safe during your journeys later this week.

5.2 Should people wear face coverings on public transport?

If you can, wear a face covering in an enclosed space where social distancing isn’t possible and where you will come into contact with people you do not normally meet. This is most relevant for short periods indoors in crowded areas, for example on public transport or in some shops. The evidence suggests that face coverings can help us protect each other and reduce the spread of the disease if you are suffering from coronavirus, but not showing symptoms.

If people choose to wear them, we are asking people to make their own face coverings at home, using scarves or other textile items. We are publishing guidance to help illustrate the process.

We urge the public not to purchase medical or surgical masks as these should be reserved for health and social care workers.

5.3 Can I use public transport to get to green spaces?

You should avoid using public transport wherever possible.

  1. Schools and Childcare

6.1 Can children go back to early years settings, schools or university?

We initially urge those who are currently eligible to use school provision (children of critical workers and vulnerable children) to attend. As soon as it is safe to do so we will bring more year groups back to school in a phased way when it is safe to have larger numbers of children within schools, but not before. Keeping children and staff safe is our utmost priority.

Schools should prepare to begin opening for more children from 1 June. The government expects children to be able to return to early years settings, and for Reception, Year 1 and Year 6 to be back in school in smaller class sizes from this point.

Secondary schools and further education colleges should also prepare to begin some face to face contact with Year 10 and 12 pupils who have key exams next year, in support of their continued remote, home learning.

The government’s ambition is for all primary school children to return to school before the summer for a month if feasible.

6.2 How will you make sure it is safe?

Schools can now operate if they are organised in a way that is compatible with minimising the spread of the virus. The next phase of measures will require the development of new safety standards to set out how physical spaces, including schools, can be adapted to operate safely.

We will publish guidance advising schools on reopening to ensure schools can adequately prepare for the next phase. One of the main protective measures we can take to reduce transmission is to have small consistent group and class sizes.

6.3 Will children be compelled to wear face coverings at school?

No this will not be required. We will publish further advice on protective measures in schools in the coming weeks.

  1. Borders / international visitors

Please note – these measures will NOT come into force on Wednesday 13 May. We will set out further detail, including from when these will be in force, in due course.

7.1 Are you isolating people at the border now?

The scientific advice shows that when domestic transmission is high, cases from abroad represent a small amount of the overall total and make no significant difference to the epidemic. Now that domestic transmission within the UK is coming under control, and other countries begin to lift lockdown measures, it is the right time to prepare new measures at the border.

7.2 What is self-isolation and which countries will it apply to?

We will be asking people travelling to the UK to make some sacrifices to stop coronavirus cases from being imported. In the same way as people in the UK have made large sacrifices to control the spread of coronavirus.

So what we will be asking people to do on entering the UK is supply their contact details and details of their accommodation, and to self-isolate in their accommodation for 14 days, other than those on a short list of exemptions.

We will set out further details shortly.

7.3 Is this for foreign travellers only or British people returning home from holiday or living overseas?

All arrivals including British nationals will be required to provide their contact information and self-isolate upon arrival, other than those on a short list of exemptions.

  1. Enforcement

8.1 How will police enforce the new rules?

The police and local authorities have the powers to enforce the requirements set out in law if people do not comply with them. The police will act with discretion and common sense in applying these measures, but if you breach the law, the police may instruct you to go home, leave an area or disperse, and they may instruct you to take steps to stop your children breaking these rules if they have already done so. The police can also take you home or arrest you where they believe it is necessary.

If the police believe that you have broken the law – or if you refuse to follow their instructions enforcing the law – a police officer may issue you with a fixed penalty notice of £100 (reduced to £50 if paid within 14 days), an increase of £40 from the previous £60 fixed penalty amount. If you have already received a fixed penalty notice, the amount for further offences will increase in line with the table below.

First offence £100
Second offence £200
Third offence £400
Fourth offence £800
Fifth offence £1600
Maximum penalty £3200

For both individuals and companies, if you do not pay your fine you could be taken to court, with magistrates able to impose unlimited fines.

  1. Devolved administrations

9.1 Does this guidance apply across the UK?

This guidance applies in England – people in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland should follow the specific rules in those parts of the UK.

If you live in Scotland, Wales or Northern Ireland additional guidance is available:

Contents

Coronavirus (COVID-19)

 

 

 

Insight into the Community Hub

 

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A  lot is made of the Community Hub and the work it is doing with local residents. The Hub’s success wouldn’t be possible without the work of the 17 community groups who are contributing so much to their individual villages

Thank You

We wanted to take the opportunity to thank all of the incredible groups below who have worked with the hub over the last few weeks. These groups will soon receive funding from the Council to support them going forward.

  • Connect Blaby Together and Blaby Parish Council
  • Braunstone Town Council
  • Cosby Community Support
  • Countesthorpe Support and Volunteers Group
  • Countesthorpe Community Fund
  • Croft Good Neighbour Scheme
  • Helping the Vulnerable in LE19
  • Glenfield Support Group (Supported by Glenfield Parish Council)
  • Kirby Muxloe Free Church
  • Leicester Forest East Parish Council
  • Littlethorpe Community Association
  • Lubbesthorpe Alive
  • Sapcote Parish Council
  • Sharnford COVID-19 Support Group
  • Stoney Stanton Good Neighbours
  • Thurlaston Parish Council
  • Whetstone Good Neighbour Scheme

The Hub’s involvement with these groups includes providing food donations to foodbanks to help keep their supplies boosted. The community groups are contacted weekly to check what help they need, including donations and driver assistance.

We have been overwhelmed by the offers of help from residents. We are looking at how best we can use people to support residents across our district and will be in contact with volunteers as soon as possible.